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that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
to happen is that american foreign policy should be consistent with the provisions of the united nations charter, which calls upon all member countries to try and settle disputes by peaceful means. as a world leader, we would like the units to set an example in trying to carry out the fundamental principles which are laid down in the freedom -- in the united nations charter. >> it was interesting, mr. ambassador. he really admired bill clinton, the president of the united states, who was there at cape town, but he was not reluctant to criticize the u.s. if he saw the u.s. going in the wrong direction. >> i think that's the model authority that he has. he wants nothing from the world and he owes the world nothing. whatever sacrifice he could have made had been made. nothing more could be done to harm him. that's why i think the power of truth was the one he spoke, but he spoke in such a gentle way. there wasn't the vittry oldic, ideological razzmatazz that he was unfolding on the united states. it was simply a reminder that a superpower has certain responsibilities in the world and needs
. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine waters, who i think played a magnificent role giving momentum to the divestment effort. just quickly i want to go back and indicate a little known bit of history. >> why was mandela in oakland, california. of all places. yankee stadium, the mayor, mayor cuomo. he came to see you, didn't he? >> i was overwhelmed. nelson mandela. oakland doesn't win a lot of battles over big cities. he said i'm going to oakland to thank ron and his constituency. for this iconic human being to come to oakland to say thank you was an amazing event. we walk out on the stage and mandela looks out into this incredible sea of humanity. he said now i better understand you, i better understand your politics. i looked at him and he said you represent the human family. you represent where we must go. you represent the future of south africa. that was such an incred
and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no one has done more. no one in our era and generation has done more to fight discrimination than the moral leadership and example of this man who suffered for 27 years yet came out of prison with his wife winnie at his side and she has been imprisoned for 18 months at that time. in the anc, they came out of prison and marched in that march and from then on, his days in prison spoke of reconciliation. for that that he won the nobel prize and went on as he became. he helped sign into law the law that outlawed discrimination against the white minority. that belief in reconciliation that created a new south africa. that was a model for nations for people around the world. >> did he do it with kindness? >> he did it with love and with kindness and wit and humor. when he came here, he so impressed american presidents, we know how close he was with bill clinto
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948. even to now, apartheid is no longer a racial matter and social issues but economic, health care, educational, job apartheid is present even today, and he was simply saying that going into iraq was a preemptive strike, broke international law. as a matter of fact, the biggest demonstration in the history of the world took place that day, people saying do not invade iraq. now we admit that 100,000 plus iraqis have been killed, 6,000 plus americans have been killed, 50,000 plus injured, we were wrong. had th
in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign policy issue for the united states? >> it seems to me that we seem to forget apartheid in our own country. i was jailed for using the public library. i was jailed for trying to use -- my father -- lots of p.o.w.s didn't have the right to use toilets, hotels, motels. we couldn't use a toilet from texas to florida to maryland. we didn't have the right to vote. and so dr. king's victory was over skin color apartheid and political apartheid and changing world opinion. now, that same movement spilled over in a major way to be the impactful force for freedom in south africa against our own national policy at that time. we changed america's policy towards south africa by our own risk and sacrifice, because anti apartheid victory in america led to apartheid victory in south africa. >> rick, what do you think of that and the reverend's point about that interplay, relatively rare to have this kind of success and an international civil rights movement. >> well, we often forget that during the whole period of the cold war, there was actually a
came during a foreign policy conversation at a washington think tank forum. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house. kristen, did the president successfully sell his deal today? >> reporter: well, craig, i think that remains to be seen. but that is what he was doing. he was trying to sell this deal to the skeptics here in the united states, but also to israelis, a lot of israeli journalists in the audience there today. if you look at the polls inside israel, a lot of folks don't like this deal. so president obama trying to convince them of the merits of this deal, making the point that, look, it is a test. it's a six-month freeze of iran's nuclear program that will be tested by inspectors who will go into the country and determine their level of seriousness. he also made the point that of the $100 billion worth of sanctions, this scales back about $7 billion of those, leaving the main sanctions in place. here's a little bit more of what he had to say this afternoon. take a listen. >> if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of
of state schultz and others, former senate foreign relations chairman dick lugar were pushing very strongly for a different policy. >> they were. they knew the veto was a mistake. right after that secretary schultz moved to redescribe anc not as terrorist organization and open up contacts with the group in osaka. >> you were on the ground when he came out -- >> after he came out. >> moved into the negotiations which were critical. >> went up and down in 1992, had a break in the negotiations, a serious break over violence. the two presidents, the two leaders, nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk came together, one of the things they agreed, which is a lesson for other peace processes that thereafter to acts of violence would be allowed to interrupt the peace process. the spoilers would not be allowed to do that. it was important because there was a lot of violence after that. >> that was also true of the northern ireland peace process. that was a key point they could not veto an agreement forward, a lesson not learned by israeli-palestinians sadly. what do you think was the special quality in ne
, in particular, foreign direct investment. i am pleased that we have already started to address the important questions of our trade policy, guided by our gatt commitments and the determination systematically to open the economy to global competition in a carefully managed process. soon we will also begin trade negotiations with, amongst others, the european union, the united states, our partners in the southern african customs unions and our neighbours in the southern african development community to provide a stable and mutually beneficial framework for our international economic relations. we will also be looking very closely at the question of enhancing south-south cooperation in general as part of the effort to expand our economic links with the rest of the world. consistent with our objective of creating a people-centred society and effectively to address the critical questions of growth, reconstruction and development, we will, together with organised labour and the private sector, pay special attention to the issue of human resource development. both the public and the private sector
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12